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Bratukhin
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Bratukhin "Omega" / 2MG
Bratukhin G-3
Bratukhin G-4
Bratukhin B-5
Bratukhin B-10
Bratukhin B-11
Bratukhin Heavy-lift Transport Helicopter
Bratukhin Flying Crane
Bratukhin Heavy-lift Transport Convertiplane
Bratukhin Transport VTOL Aircraft
Bratukhin Tilt-rotor VTOL Aircraft


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Bratukhin "Omega" / 2MG - Twin-rotor experimental helicopter. Both rotors were driven by separate MV-6 piston engines linked with a synchronizing shaft. First flew in 1941.

  • "Omega II" / G-2 - Original intended design with redesigned gearboxes, clutches, cooling system, and other changes, including different engines (what kind??). Developed around 1945 and was used for training purposes. Soon it was retired due to worn engines.

Bratukhin G-3 / AK - Twin-rotor helicopter based on the G-2 for operational use by VVS as AK (Artilleriiskii Korrektirovshchik - artillery correction). Identical to earlier design except for upgraded engines (what kind?/). First flown in 1945. At least 12 were built, including the first two prototypes. At least one was used by the VVS as a trainer.

Bratukhin G-4 - Twin-rotor helicopter based on the G-3 but slightly larger, equipped with two AI-26GR piston engines. Two prototypes were built, the first of which flew in October 1947 by M.K. Baikalov and second a month later. In 1948 the first G-4 was damaged due to exhaustive autorotational descents and deadstick landings. It was series produced in 1947-1948 with reportedly ten being built.

Bratukhin B-5 - Scaled-up derivative of the G-4 intended to carry 8 passengers. Powered by supercharged version of the AI-26GR engine using same gearboxes. A straight wing replaced the original tube frame supporting the engine-rotor blocks.  A single example was completed and flown in 1947 but was testing was limited due to inadequate wing stiffness and no serious plans to use experimental aircraft for passenger traffic.

Bratukhin B-6 - Two-seat twin-rotor helicopter (?)

Bratukhin B-7 - Project for a heavy twin-rotor transport helicopter in 1947. Construction stopped by demand of the Council of Ministers for further development testing of the G-4 and B-5.

Bratukhin B-8 - Light agricultural helicopter. (?)

Bratukhin B-9 - Five-seat air-ambulance helicopter designed and built in 1947 to carry four patients and a nurse. Possibly based on the B-5.

Bratukhin B-10 - Twin-rotor helicopter based on the B-9 originally intended to replace the AK in artillery spotting. Single example built and flown 1947. ShKAS machine guns were later fitted in ball turrets, one above the co.ckpit and the other at the tail. Despite positive performance it failed to catch any interest due to general distrust of rotary-wing design.

Bratukhin B-11 - Refined development of the B-10 to compete with Mil and Yak single-rotor submissions to the VVS requirement for a three-seat all-weather communications helicopter. Two prototypes built and flown in 1948. They performed well despite vibration problems and at least one instance of a hydraulic leak. During one test a rotor blade broke free, resulting in a crash that killed pilot K.I. Ponomarev. Numerous modifications were tested with newer engines, but none received support.

Bratukhin B-12 - Project for a light multipurpose helicopter with a take-off weight of 2500kg. There were at least three variations of the design, though it appears that none were built:

  • #1 - 1948 proposal with two Shvetsov M-11FR-1 engines. Slightly boxier design than the later designs that followed.
  • #2 - 1949 proposal with two Vedeneyev M14 engines.
  • #3 - 1949 proposal with M-11FR-1 engines.

Bratukhin B-13 - ?

Bratukhin B-14 - Project for a twin-rotor helicopter in 1951.

Bratukhin-MAI heavy-lift transport helicopter - Project for a heavy cold-cycle tip-jet transport helicopter researched by Ivan Bratukhin and his students at Moscow Aviation Institute. Some layouts are wingless or have short wings, other layouts have long wings with two engines driving four-blade propellers. Unbuilt.

Bratukhin heavy-lift transport convertiplane - Heavy-lift tip-jet convertiplane project. Layout options the same as above. Unbuilt

Bratukhin flying-crane - Tip-jet flying crane project. An alternate layout includes wings with engines at the tips driving 4-blade propellers. Unbuilt.

Bratukhin VTOL tailsitter aircraft - 1954 project for a tailsitter VTOL aircraft with four engines each driving rotors at the tips of an X-shaped wing layout. Unbuilt.

Bratukhin VTOL tilt-wing aircraft - Project for a tilt-wing aircraft (Not tilt-rotor as reported elsewhere!!) around 1955-1956 intended for passenger transport. Unbuilt.

 


-- Edited by hannetonIII on Friday 6th of June 2014 03:13:27 AM



-- Edited by hannetonIII on Tuesday 10th of June 2014 12:46:15 AM

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OMG HannetonIII welcome back in action!



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Thanks Leela. My life situation is a bit more stable now so I can get in on the action more often.smile



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B-9 was an unbuilt medevac helicopter based on the B-5 IIRC.



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B-6 was a two-seat twin-rotor helicopter in common with the rest of the early designs by I.P. Bratukhin's bureau. B-8 was a light agricultural helicopter.

The B-9 was designed and built in 1947 as a five-seat air-ambulance helicopter designed to carry four patients and a nurse. It was also a twin-rotor helicopter like other common Bratukhin helicopters.

Bratukhin also experimented with tip-jet designs in the early 50s and tested a ramjet rotor system and engine setup on a static test stand, but the tests were unsatisfactory partially becaese the stand was not strong enough to support the stress of the kind of testing that was required in researching the design. The research stopped altogether when Bratukhin's bureau was disbanded in 1951.

As far as I can tell the B-13 designation is nonexistent.



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Thanks for the info! Just updated the list!

 

Pepper wrote:

Bratukhin also experimented with tip-jet designs in the early 50s and tested a ramjet rotor system and engine setup on a static test stand, but the tests were unsatisfactory partially becaese the stand was not strong enough to support the stress of the kind of testing that was required in researching the design. The research stopped altogether when Bratukhin's bureau was disbanded in 1951.


 How can that be when there are Bratukhin designs for tip-jet helicopters dating later than 1951?



-- Edited by hannetonIII on Tuesday 10th of June 2014 12:48:24 AM

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Read your text more carefully. Those later designs were only design studies he researched with his students at MAI. There may be a small connection with these and his work at OKB-3 but they are otherwise not the same efforts.



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Thats makes sense thanks.



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Pepper wrote:

Read your text more carefully. Those later designs were only design studies he researched with his students at MAI. There may be a small connection with these and his work at OKB-3 but they are otherwise not the same efforts.


 I'd say they are definitely related. Wasn't OKB-3 absorbed by another bureu?



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Leela25 wrote:
Wasn't OKB-3 absorbed by another bureu?

 No...

But I think a majority of the staff joined Kamov afterwards.



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