Members Login
Post Info TOPIC: Sikorsky models


Veteran Member - Level 3

Posts: 403
Date: Jan 23, 2011
Sikorsky models
Permalink  
 


While this is true Sarah, don't forget the fact that it's coaxial. Sure it counteracts the dissymmetry of lift but it also relieves stress by having the other rotors.

You are thinking of a single rigid rotor system, which in fact would have its share in problems not being hinged.


__________________
Gravity doesn't exist. The Earth sucks.


Veteran Member - Level 2

Posts: 207
Date: Jan 23, 2011
Permalink  
 

I feel dumb that I forgot having another set of rotors will balance the forces and therefore relieve any stress being put on one set of rotors... because another set is there to relieve it and change the force.

__________________
Love is the best medicine, and there is more than enough to go around once you open your heart.

-Julie Marie


Veteran Member - Level 3

Posts: 317
Date: Jan 23, 2011
Permalink  
 

Thanx Sarah...I know what you mean about finding time..............I'll be in the woods training next week...........

__________________

Από κάθε γενιά μεταξύ κάθε έθνος ανθρώπων, να θυμάστε νεκρών στρατιωτών μας.



Veteran Member - Level 2

Posts: 207
Date: Jan 23, 2011
Permalink  
 

Wishing you the best of luck Dave smile



__________________
Love is the best medicine, and there is more than enough to go around once you open your heart.

-Julie Marie


Veteran Member - Level 1

Posts: 67
Date: May 24, 2011
Permalink  
 

Hello!

Here I have scans of the R-6A from "American Helicopter" magazine, December 1945, pages 10-12.

Thanks,

Mike



Attachments
__________________

o0pm0em0m4g6nto768f9d8o.jpg



Veteran Member - Level 1

Posts: 67
Date: May 29, 2011
Permalink  
 

Hello!

The R-6 for frost-control, from "American Helicopter" Magazine, May 1946, page 26.



Attachments
__________________

o0pm0em0m4g6nto768f9d8o.jpg



Former Deputy Administrator

Posts: 897
Date: May 30, 2011
Permalink  
 

Thanks HueyMike for these and all the other recent scans! ;)

__________________

Stéphane



Global Moderator

Posts: 1327
Date: Feb 4, 2012
Permalink  
 

Okay here I go. I Leela25 am about to embark on an epic journey.

I am going to list EVERY known Sikorsky designation, in the HannetonIII style designation list. Wish me luck and stay tuned! :D

 

 

 

Sikorsky S-1 - 1909 coaxial machine with 25hp Anzani engine.

Sikorsky S-2 - 1910 coaxial machine with the same engine, but the weight of the machine was too much for it.

Vought-Sikorsky VS-300 / S-46 - Experimental 3-blade heli with 75hp Lycoming 4-cylinder engine (then 90hp Franklin in 1940).

  • S-47 / VS-300A - (I guess the version with enclosed fuselage?)

Sikorsky R-4 / VS-316A / S-48 - evelopment of VS-300, 3-blade two-seat heli. First helicopter to be mass-produced at a large scale.

  • XR-4 - One prototype Model VS-316A with a crew of two and dual controls, 165 hp R-500-3 engine, became XR-4C
  • YR-4A - Version with larger rotor diameter and a 180 hp R-550-1 engine; three built.
  • YR-4B - Version with detailed changes; 27 built for development testing followed by a further batch of 14, seven to US Navy as HNS-1s.
  • R-4B - Production version with 200 hp R-550-3 engine; 100 built including 20 for the US Navy and 45 for the Royal Air Force.
  • XR-4C - Prototype XR-4 re-engined with 180 hp R-550-1 engine with the larger YR-4A type rotor.
  • HNS-1 - Three YR-4Bs and 22 R-4Bs transferred to the US Navy; two diverted to the United States Coast Guard.
  • Hoverfly I - UK military designation of the R-4 for the Royal Air Force and Royal Navy; 52 delivered and one later transferred to the Royal Canadian Air Force. (replaced the Cierva C.30A autogyros of No.529 Squadron from August 1944)
  • Sikorsky S-54 - An R-4B modified with an observers seat aft of the main rotor gearbox for trials.

Sikorsky R-5 / H-5 / S-51 / HO2S / VS-327 / Horse - Tandem two-seat 3-blade heli with 450hp Wasp Junior radial engine.

  • XR-5 - Prototype based on the VS.372 (???) with two seats and tailwheel landing gear and powered by a 450hp R-985-AN-5, five built.
  • YR-5A - As the XR-5 with minor modifications, 26 built including two to the United States Navy as the HO2S-1.
  • R-5A - Production rescue model with provision for two external stretchers, 34 built later re-designated H-5A.
  • R-5B / YR-5B - Modified R-5A, not built.
  • YR-5C / XR-5C - Modified R-5A, not built.
  • R-5D - Modified R-5As with nose-wheel landing gear, rescue hoist, twenty conversion later re-designated H-5D.
  • YR-5E - Modified YR-5As with dual controls, five conversions later re-designated YH-5E.
  • R-5E / H-5E - ? (Might be mistake of "Y" preseries versions)
  • R-5F - Civil model S-51 four-seaters bought in 1947, 11 built later re-designated H-5F.
  • H-5G - Four-seater as H-5F with rescue equipment, 39 bought.
  • H-5H - As H-5G with updated equipment, 16 built.
  • HO2S-1 - Two YR-5As to the United States Navy later passed to the United States Coast Guard, order for 34 cancelled.
  • HO3S-1 - Four-seat version for the USN similar to the H-5F, 88 built.
  • HO3S-1G - HO3S-1 for the United States Coast Guard, nine built.
  • HO3S-2 - Was a naval version of the H-5H, not built.
  • HO3S-3 - One HO3S-1 modified in 1950 with a redesigned rotor.
  • S-51 - Civil four-seat transport version; four purchased for inventory for U.S. Navy
  • Westland WS.51 "Dragonfly"- UK licence built version. (Prototype with 550hp Alvis Leonides engine)
    • Dragonfly HR.1 - Air-sea search and rescue helicopter for the Royal Navy powered by a 540 hp (400 kW) Alvis 50 radial piston engine. Thirteen built, some modified later as HR.5s.
    • Dragonfly HC.2 - Casualty evacuation helicopter for the Royal Air Force similar to the commercial Mark 1A, three built.
    • Dragonfly HR.3 - Air-sea search and rescue helicopter for the Royal Navy. Similar to the Dragonfly HR.1, but fitted with all-metal rotor blades, 58 built some later modified as HR.5s.
    • Dragonfly HC.4 - Casualty evacuation helicopter for the RAF similar to the Dragonfly HR.3 with all-metal rotor blades, 12 built.
    • Dragonfly HR.5 - Air-sea search and rescue helicopter for the Royal Navy similar to the Dragonfly HR.3. Modified from HR.1 and HR.3.
    • Westland-Sikorsky WS-51 Mk.1A - Civil transport helicopter powered by a 520 hp (388 kW) Alvis Leonides 521/1 radial piston engine. Built by Westland in the United Kingdom.
    • Westland-Sikorsky WS-51 Mk.1B - Civil transport helicopter powered by a 450 hp (336 kW) Pratt & Whitney R-985 Wasp Junior B4 radial piston engine.
  • Unknown commercial VS.327 proposal also existed.

Sikorsky R-6 / Model 49 (?) - Light two-seat heli with 225hp Lycoming O-435-7 engine. (R-6 was developed parallel with the improved R-5 but was basically a refinement of the R-4 design)

----------------- Beginning with the R-6, helicopters flown by the U.S. Coast Guard had Navy designations with the suffix letter (as HOS-1G) until the 1962 redesignation of U.S. military aircraft.  

  • XR-6 - prototype powered by a 225 h.p. Franklin O-435-7 (1)
  • XR-6A -  as XR-6 but powered by the 240 h.p. O-405-9 (5) of which 3 to the US Navy as XHOS-1
  • YR-6A  - as XR-6A with small changes (26) built by Nash-Kelvinator
  • R-6A - production model (193) built by Nash-Kelvinator of which 36 to US Navy as HOS-1 and 27 to the RAF as Hoverfly II
  • R-6B - projected variant with 225 h.p. O-435-7, but not proceeded with
  • XR-7 - projected development of the XR-6 with a 240hp O-405-9 engine, not built.
  • Doman LZ-1A - One R-6A modified as a test bed with a Doman-designed hingless rotor blades and self-lubricating rotor hub.

Sikorsky S-50 - Design study for a small two-seat helicopter, powered by a 150-horsepower engine. It had an estimated gross weight of 1,600 pounds. A full-scale wooden mock-up was completed in late 1943, but the S-50 was never built.

(possibly a planned R-5 development, or a design that led to S-51??)

Designation seems to also corrispond to the VS-327 (R-5 up to "E" version and HO2S).

Sikorsky S-51 / H-5 / HO3S - See R-5 list.

Sikorsky S-52 / H-18 - utility helicopter of 1940s.

  • S-52 - Two seat prototype powered by a 133kW Franklin engine. Recieved S-52-1 designation when used for altitude/speed records.
  • S-52-2 - Four-seat variant with a 183kW Franklin O-425-1 engine. Ordered by the US Marine Corps as a replacement for the HO3S.
  • YH-18 / YH-18A - Four S-52-2s for evaluation by the United States Army, two later converted into XH-39s.
  • YH-18B - (S-52-4 / S-52-5) (?????)
  • HO5S-1Model S-52-3, a United States Navy variant of the four-seat S-52-2, 79 built.
  • HO5S-1G - As HO5S-1 for the United States Coast Guard, eight built.
  • XH-39 - Model S-59 turboprop powered prototype modified from two YH-18As.
  • Hummingbird 260L - Sold by Vertical Technologies of Sanford, Florida, the Hummingbird 260L is a kit-built design using the basic airframe, blades, main transmission, and tail rotor drive of the Sikorsky S-52 helicopter, but streamlined with a Bell 206 JetRanger nosecone and windshields. The Hummingbird is powered by a Lycoming VO-435—a vertically opposed 435-cubic-inch engine.

Sikorsky S-53 - Four-seat military helicopter similar to S-51 with tricycle u/c, small tail rotor pylon, tailplane and powered by one 525hp Continental R-975-34 engine. Prot. Bu. 30368 FF 22 Sept. 1947. 3 built.

  • XHJS / XHJS-1 - Two prototypes as Navy utility helis. It was evaluated against the Piaseckli XHJP-1. With the Piasceki design being ordered as the HUP-1 by the Navy the S-53 was not developed further.

Sikorsky S-54 - See the R-4 list.

Sikorsky S-55 "Chickasaw" / H-19 / HO4S / HRS - Multi-purpose helicopter.

  • YH-19 - Five early production S-55s for evaluation.
  • H-19A - USAF version of the YH-19 powered by a 600 hp, (472 kW) R-1340-57 engine, redeisgnated UH-19A in 1962, 50 built.
  • SH-19A - H-19As modified for air-sea rescue, redesignated HH-19A in 1962.
  • H-19B - H-19A with a more powerful 700 hp, (522 kW) R-1300-3 engine, redesignated UH-19B in 1962, 264 built.
  • SH-19B - H-19Bs modified for air-sea rescue, redesignated HH-19B in 1962.
  • H-19C - US Army version of the H-19A, redesignated UH-19C in 1962, 72 built.
  • H-19D - US Army version of the H-19B, redesignated UH-19D in 1962, 301 built.
  • HO4S-1 - US Navy version of the H-19A, 10 built.
  • HO4S-2 - Project for rescue version for the United States Coast Guard, not built.
  • HO4S-3 - Re-engined US Navy & Canadian version with 700 hp, (522 kW) Wright R-1300 engine, redesignated UH-19F (American variant) H04S-3 (Canadian variant) in 1962, 79 built.
  • HO4S-3G - United States Coast Guard version of the HO4S-3, redesignated HH-19G in 1962, 30 built.
  • HRS-1 - United States Marine Corps version of the HO4S for eight troops, 60 built.
  • HRS-2 - HRS-1 with equipment changes, 101 built.
  • HRS-3 - HRS-2 with a 700 hp, (522 kW) R-1300-3 engine, became CH-19E in 1962, 105 built and conversions from HRS-2.
  • HRS-4 - Project for HRS-3 with a 1,025 hp, (764 kW) R-1820 radial engine, not built.
  • S-55 - Commercial version with 600 hp, (472 kW) R-1340 engine.
  • S-55A - Commercial version with 800 hp, (596 kW) R-1300-3 engine.
  • S-55C - S-55A with a 600 hp, (472 kW) R-1340 engine.
  • S-55T - aircraft modified by Aviation Specialties and produced and marketed by Helitec with a 650 shp, (485 kW) Garrett AiResearch TPE-331-3U-303 turboshaft and updated equipment.
  • S-55QT - Commercial conversion. Ultra-quiet helicopter for sight-seeing flights over the Grand Canyon.
  • OHA-S-55 Heli-Camper - Commercial conversions carried out by Orlando Helicopters.
  • OHA-S-55 Nite-Writer - Commercial conversion. Aerial advertising helicopter, fitted with a 12.2-m x (40-ft x 8-ft) array of computer-controlled lights.
  • OHA-S-55 Bearcat - Commercial conversion. Agricultural helicopter.
  • OHA-S-55 Heavy Lift - Commercial conversion. Flying crane helicopter.
  • QS-55 Aggressors - Commercial conversion. S-55 helicopters converted into flying targets.
  • OHA-AT-55 Defender - Commercial conversion. Armed military helicopter.
  • Whirlwind HAR21 - HRS-2 for Royal Navy, ten delivered.
  • Whirlwind HAS22 - H04S-3 for Royal Navy, 15 delivered.

Sikorsky S-56 / CH-37 "Mojave" / HR2S - 1950s standard heavy-lift and flying crane heli.

---------- Rotor and gearbox served as basis for Westland Westminster development.

  • XHR2S-1 - Prototype Assault Transport for the US Marine Corps, powered by two 1,900 hp (1,400 kW) R-2800-54 engines, four built.
  • HR2S-1 - Production model with modified engine nacelles, twin mainwheels and dorsal fin, redesignated CH-37C in 1962, 55 built (order for additional 36 cancelled).
  • HR2S-1W - Airborne early warning (AEW) aircraft for the US Navy, two built. Had a bulbous dielectric radome under the nose. The Navy ultimately abandoned further development of the HR2S-1W because severe airframe vibration severely degraded the radar's performance.
  • YH-37 - One HR2S-1 helicopter evaluated by the US Army.
  • H-37A Mojave - Military transport version of the HR2S for the US Army, changes included dorsal fin and modified rotor head fairing, redesignated CH-37A in 1962, 94 built.
  • H-37B Mojave - All but four of the H-37As were modified with a re-designed cargo door, automatic stabilization equipment and crashproof fuel cells. Later redesignated CH-37B.

Sikorsky S-57 / XV-2 - Projected experimental stoppable-rotor convertiplane developed for a joint research program between the Air Force and Army. Prototype serial number 54-4403, but was never constructed.

Sikorsky S-58 / HSS "Seabat" / HUS "Seahorse" / CH-34 "Choctaw" - piston-engined military helicopter originally designed as an ASW heli.

  • H-34A - U.S. Army version of the HSS-1 powered by a 1,525 hp R-1820-84, re-designated CH-34A in 1962, 359 built and 21 transferred from the U.S. Navy.
  • JH-34A - Designation for H-34A used for weapon tests.
  • VH-34A - Staff transport conversions of H-34A.
  • H-34B - H-34As converted with detail changes, became CH-34B in 1962.
  • H-34C - H-34B design with detail changes converted from H-34As, became CH-34C in 1962.
  • JH-34C - Designation for CH-34C used for weapon tests.
  • VH-34C - Staff transport conversions of CH-34C.
  • HH-34D - Designation applied to aircraft given USAF serials to be transferred under MAP and MDAP.
  • LH-34DHUS-1L re-designated in 1962
  • H-34G.I - Version for Germany.
  • UH-34J - SH-34J without ASW equipment for cargo and training purposes.
  • HH-34J - Ex-USN UH-34Js operated by the U.S. Air Force
  • VH-34J - Staff transport conversions of SH-34J.
  • XHSS-1 Seabat - Three Sikorsky S-58s for evaluation by the U.S. Navy, re-designated YHSS-1 then YSH-34G in 1962.
  • HSS-1 Seabat - Production Anti-Submarine model for the U.S. Navy, re-designated SH-34G in 1962, 215 built
  • HSS-1F Seabat - One HSS-1 re-engined with two YT-58-GE as a flying test bed, re-designated SH-34H in 1962.
  • YHSS-1N Seabat - One HSS-1 converted as the HSS-1N prototype, re-designated YSH-34J in 1962.
  • HSS-1N Seabat - Night/Bad weather version of the HSS-1 with improved avionics and autopilot, re-designated SH-34J in 1962, 167 built (an addition 75 HSS-1 airframes were built to CH-34C standard for West Germany).
  • HUS-1 Seahorse - Utility transport version of the HSS-1 for the U.S. Marine Corps, re-designated UH-34D in 1962, 462 built
  • HUS-1A Seahorse - Forty HUS-1s fitted with amphibious pontoons, re-designated UH-34E in 1962.
  • HUS-1G Seahorse - United States Coast Guard version of the HUS-1, re-designated HH-34F in 1962, six built.
  • HUS-1L Seahorse - Four HUS-1s converted for antarctic operations with VXE-6, re-designated LH-34D in 1962.
  • HUS-1Z Seahorse - Seven HUS-1s fitted with VIP interior for the Executive Flight Detachment, re-designated VH-34D in 1962.
  • S-58 - Commercial designation for basic cargo variant
  • S-58B - Commercial designation for improved cargo variant
  • S-58C - Commercial passenger transport/airliner version
  • S-58D - Commercial airliner/freighter version
  • S-58T - Commercial conversions to turboshaft power by Sikorsky, Orlando Helicopter, and California Helicopter.
  • S-58 Heli-Camper - Commercial conversion, fitted with a Wright Cyclone R-1820-24 engine.
  • Orlando Airliner (?) - Commercial conversion. 18-seat passenger transport helicopter.

Sikorsky S-59 - Army's first turbine-powered heli with 400shp Continental XT51 engine. Rejected in favor of the Bell XH-40 (later UH-1).

  • XH-39 - Former YH-18A modified with 250 hp XT51-T-3 Artouste I turbine for static testing, not flown and later modified back to YH-18A standard.
  • XH-39A - Former YH-18A modified for U.S. Army with Artouste II turbine for flight testing.

Sikorsky S-60 - Prototype twin-engined heavy-lift flying-crane derived from the S-56 in 1958. It was underpowered (with two 3020kW JFTD-12A turboshaft engines) and crashed in April 1961. The wreckage was transferred to the New England Air Museum in the 1970s, and is currently being restored by the Connecticut Air and Space Center in Stratford, Connecticut.

Sikorsky S-61 / SH-3 "Sea King" - Twin-engine ASW helicopter developed to replace the outdated S-58 (HSS-1).

  • XHSS-2 - Prototype of the H-3 Sea King.
  • YHSS-2 - Prototype and trials aircraft. Seven helicopters were built for the US Navy.
  • SH-3A  - Anti-submarine warfare helicopter for the US Navy (245 built); originally designated HSS-2.
  • HH-3A - Search and rescue helicopter for the US Navy (12 converted from SH-3A).
  • CH-3A - Military transport version for the US Air Force (three converted from SH-3A later became CH-3B).
  • NH-3A (S-61F) - Experimental high speed compound helicopter, with extensive streamlining, no floats, short wings carrying two turbojet engines for extra speed.(1 Converted from SH-3A). Later modified with a tail rotor able to rotate 90° to serve as a pusher propeller.
  • RH-3A - Minesweeper helicopter for the US Navy (9 converted from SH-3A).
  • VH-3A - VIP transport helicopter for the US Army and Marine Corps (eight built, plus 2 SH-3A (STAKE) conversions which were rebuilt from damaged helicopters (one YHSS-2 and one SH-3A); originally designated VHSS-2. One (Army operated) was given to Egypt in 1972 and one (also Army operated) crashed at Walker Key, Bahamas in 1973; the rest were returned to the US Navy (HC-6) in 1975/6) and replaced by the VH-3D. At least 2 have subsequently been placed in museums.
  • CH-3B - Military transport helicopter for the US Air Force.
  • SH-3D (S-61B) (HSS-2A) - Anti-submarine warfare helicopter for the US Navy (73 built and two conversions from SH-3As).
  • SH-3D (S-61B) - Anti-submarine warfare helicopter for the Spanish Navy (six built).
  • SH-3D-TS - Anti-submarine warfare version.
  • VH-3D - VIP transport helicopter for the US Army (until 30 June 1976) and the US Marine Corps.
  • SH-3G - Cargo, utility transport helicopter for the US Navy (105 Conversions from SH-3A and SH-3D).
  • SH-3H (HSS-2B) - Anti-submarine warfare helicopter for the US Navy (Conversions from older versions).
  • SH-3H AEW - Airborne early warning version for the Spanish navy.
  • UH-3H - cargo, utility transport version for the US Navy.
  • S-61 - Company designation for the H-3 Sea King.
  • S-61A - Export version for the Royal Danish Air Force. Wider pontoons w/o flotation bags, a 530 liter centre tank instead of a dipping sonar and no automatic powered folding system.
  • S-61A-4 Nuri - Military transport, search and rescue helicopter for the Royal Malaysian Air Force. It can seat up to 31 combat troops (38 built).
  • S-61A/AH - Utility helicopter for survey work and search and rescue in the Antarctic.
  • S-61B - Export version of the SH-3 anti-submarine warfare helicopter for the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force.
  • S-61D-3 - Export version for the Brazilian Navy.
  • S-61D-4 - Export version for the Argentine Navy.
  • S-61NM - ?
  • S-61NR - Search and rescue version for the Argentine Air Force.
  • S-61L/N - Civil versions of the Sea King. ((See list continued.))
  • S-61R - The S-61R served in the United States Air Force as the CH-3C/E Sea King and the HH-3E Jolly Green Giant, and with the United States Coast Guard and the Italian Air Force as the HH-3F Sea King (more commonly referred to by the nickname "Pelican").
  • S-61V - Company designation for the VH-3A, (1 built for Indonesia).
  • S-61V-1 - Export version of the VH-3A, one built for Indonesia.
  • United Aircraft of Canada CH-124 - Anti-submarine warfare helicopter for the Royal Canadian Navy (41 assembled by United Aircraft of Canada).
  • CH-124A - The Sea King Improvement Program (SKIP) added modernized avionics as well as improved safety features.
  • CH-124B  - Alternate version of the CH-124A without a dipping sonar but formerly with a MAD sensor and additional storage for deployable stores. In 2006, the 5 aircraft of this variant were converted to support the Standing Contingency Task Force (SCTF), and were modified with additional troop seats, and frequency agile radios. Plans to add fast-rope capability, EAPSNIPS (Engine Air Particle Separator / Snow & Ice Particle Separator) did not come to fruition.
  • CH-124B2 - 6 CH-124B's were upgraded to the CH-124B2 standard in 1991-1992. The revised CH-124B2 retained the sonobuoy processing gear to passively detect submarines but, the aircraft was now also fitted with a towed-array sonar to supplement the ship's sonar. Since anti-submarine warfare is no longer a major priority within the Canadian Forces, the CH-124B2 were refitted again to become improvised troop carriers for the newly formed Standing Contingency Task Force/
  • CH-124C - One CH-124 operated by the Helicopter Operational Test and Evaluation Facility located at CFB Shearwater. Used for testing new gear, and when not testing new gear, it is deployable to any Canadian Forces ship requiring a helicopter.
  • CH-124U - Unofficial designation for 4 CH-124's that were modified for passenger/freight transport. One crashed in 1973, and the survivors were later refitted to become CH-124A's.

Sikorsky S-61N, etc. - Covered in S-61 list, continued for further clarification.

  • S-61L - Non-amphibious civil transport version. It can seat up to 30 passengers (13 Built).
  • S-61L Mk II - Improved version of the S-61L helicopter, equipped with cargo bins.
  • S-61N  - Amphibious civil transport version.
  • S-61N Mk II - Improved version of the S-61N helicopter.
  • S-61NM - ?
  • S-61 Payloader  - Stripped down machine optimised for aerial crane work; features the fixed undercarriage of the S-61L, but with an empty weight almost 900 kg (2000 lb) less than the standard S-61N.
  • S-61 Shortsky - Shortened conversion of the S-61L and N, designed to increase single engine performance and external payload.
  • S-61T Triton - S-61 modernized upgrade by Sikorsky and Carson; initial models converted were S-61N.
  • AS-61N-1 - ?

Sikorsky S-61R / CH-3 / HH-3 "Jolly Green Giant" - Covered in S-61 list, continued for further clarification.

  • S-61R - Military transport helicopter, Sikorsky model number.
  • HR3S-1 - Proposed transport helicopter for U.S. Marine Corps, cancelled
  • S-61R-10 - Prototype operated by Sikorsky and first flown 17 June 1963.
  • S-61R-12 - One aircraft for the Argentine Air Force to HH-3F standards.
  • CH-3C - Long-range military transport helicopter for the US Air Force, 75 built.
  • CH-3E  - Long-range military transport helicopter for the US Air Force, 45 Built.
  • HH-3E Jolly Green Giant - Long-range search and rescue helicopter for the US Air Force, 10 built and converted from CH-3E.
  • MH-3E - Special Operations version for the US Air Force.
  • VH-3E - US Air Force VIP transport helicopter.
  • HH-3F "Pelican" - Long-range search and rescue helicopter for the US Coast Guard, 40 built.
  • AS-61R (HH-3F Pelican) - Long-range search and rescue helicopter built since 1974 under license in Italy by Agusta, 22 built.

Sikorsky S-61F / NH-3 - SH-3A test heli with 9.75m-span wings supporting two 1350kg Pratt & Whitney J60 podded jet engines, which complimented the two General Electric T58-GE-8B turboshafts. First had a five-blade rotor but was later changed to a six-blade. It reached a level speed of 390km/h.

-----------Officially listed as an HSS-2, the U.S. Navy's BuNo. 148033

Sikorsky S-61D - Planned derivative of HH-3?

Sikorsky S-61 Advanced Sea King - ?

Sikorsky S-62 / HH-52 - Single-turbine sea-rescue heli originally developed as a commercial venture.

  • S-62 - Prototype. First flew on the 22nd of May 1958.
  • S-62A - Amphibious transport helicopter, powered by a General Electric CT58-110-1 turboshaft engine, with accommodation for up to 11 passengers. The S-62A was the first production version.
  • S-62B - One S-62 was fitted with the main rotor system of the S-58. Initial designation was S-63.
  • S-62C - Company designation of the HH-52A Seaguard.
  • HU2S-1G - Original designation of the HH-52A Seaguard. Redesignated HH-52A in 1962.
  • HH-52A Seaguard - Search and rescue helicopter for the United States Coast Guard. 99 built including one transferred to Iceland.

Sikorsky S-63 - Initial designation of the S-62B.

Sikorsky S-64 / CH-54 "Tarhe" - Twin-engine heavy-lift flying-crane. Was being developed at the same time of the S-60 project.

  • YCH-54A - Pre-production aircraft, six built.
  • CH-54A - Production model powered by two 4,500 shp (3,400 kW) Pratt & Whitney T73-P-1 turboshafts, 54 built.
  • CH-54B - Heavier version of the CH-54A with two 4,800 shp (3,600 kW) T-73-P-700 turboshafts and twin-wheeled main undercarriage, 37 built.
  • S-64A - Six test and evaluation helicopters for the US Army.
  • S-64B - 7 civil CH-54A aircraft.
  • S-64E (Erickson Aircrane) - FAA certification of the improved S-64E for civil use was announced in 1969, for the transportation of external cargo weighing up to 9,072kg.
  • S-64F - Designation of a commercial version of the S-64 powered by two Pratt & Whitney JFTD12-5A engines.

Sikorsky S-65 / CH-53 Sea Stallion - Family of Heavy-lift transport helicopters.

  • YCH-53A - Two prototypes with two 2,850 shp (2,130 kW) T64-GE-3 engines.
  • CH-53A - Initial production for USMC, 139 built.
  • RH-53A - CH-53A re-engined with two 3,925 shp (2,927 kW) T64-GE-413 engines as Airborne mine countermeasures (minesweeper) versions for the United States Navy, 15 conversion.
  • TH-53A - Stripped CH-53As used for training by the United States Air Force.
  • CH-53D - CH-53A with improved transmission, larger cabin for 55 troops and automatic rotor blade folding for the United States Marine Corps, 126 built.
  • RH-53D - United States Navy mine countermeasures version of the CH-53D, fitted with 0.50 in guns and provision for air refueling, 30 built for the USN and six for Imperial Iranian Navy Aviation (since 1979, the Islamic Republic of Iran Navy Aviation).
  • VH-53D - Two CH-53Ds for USMC VIP transport
  • CH-53D Yas'ur - CH-53D exported to Israel. The Yas'ur 2000 version are helicopters upgraded and improved by the Israel Aircraft Industries to extend life span past 2000. The Yas'ur 2025 is a further upgraded version with new systems and new gearboxes.
  • VH-53F - Six unbuilt VIP helicopters for the US Navy/Marine Corps.
  • CH-53G - German base version of the CH-53D for German Army Aviation Corps. A total of 112 were produced including 2 pre-production and 20 assembled by VFW-Fokker and 90 built by Sprey. As of 2007, 89 German CH-53s were in service, with 80 planned to be in service in 2014. All German CH-53s are going to receive T64-100 engines (in 3 batches, 1st batch has already been installed, 2nd batch is currently being installed and 3rd batch is planned with funding made available). All will receive IFR-capability.
  • CH-53GS - Update of 20 CH-53Gs with additional missile counter measure, upgraded communication and navigation system and two external fuel tanks in late 1990s. They later received the first batch of T64-100 engines to operate in hot&high conditions as they prevail in Afghanistan as well as MG3 and M3M machine guns. A CH-53GS/GE update has also been ordered to provide combat search-and-rescue (CSAR) capability to 26 helicopters.
  • CH-53GE - A configuration based on CH-53GS combat search-and-rescue (CSAR) capabilities. The upgrade configuration was formerly known as CH-53GSX. It further updates with modern electronics, two external fuel tanks, counter measures and dust filters for the engines. Upgrade was ordered to support Afghanistan deployment.
  • CH-53GA - Update of further 40 CH-53Gs with new flight deck, new flight control system, autopilot, navigation and communication systems, FLIR, ECM and missile counter measures as well as provisions for additional internal fuel tanks. The CH-53GA helicopter successfully completed its first flight in February 2010. The upgrade is to be completed in 2013.

Sikorsky MH-53 Pave Low - Continued from CH-53 family list.

  • TH-53A - training version used by US Air Force (USAF)
  • HH-53B - CH-53A type for USAF search and rescue (SAR)
  • CH-53C - heavy-lift version for USAF, 22 built
  • HH-53C - "Super Jolly Green Giant", improved HH-53B for USAF
  • S-65C-2 (S-65o) - export version for Austria, later to Israel
  • S-65-C3 - export version for Israel
  • YHH-53H - prototype Pave Low I aircraft
  • HH-53H Pave Low II - night infiltrator
  • MH-53H - redesignation of HH-53H
  • MH-53J "Pave Low III" - special operations conversions of HH-53B, HH-53C, and HH-53H.
  • MH-53M "Pave Low IV" - upgraded MH-53Js

Sikorsky CH-53E Super Stallion (S-80) - Continued from CH-53 family list.

  • S-80 - Company designation.
  • CH-53E Super Stallion - Used by US Marine Corps for amphibious assault, carrying heavy equipment and armament, and recovering disabled aircraft; also used by US Navy for vertical onboard delivery and recovery of damaged aircraft from aircraft carriers.
  • MH-53E Sea Dragon - Airborne mine countermeasures helicopter able to tow through water hydrofoil sledge carrying mechanical, acoustic and magnetic sensors; nearly 3,785 litres (1,000 US gallons; 833 Imp gallons) extra fuel carried in enlarged sponsons made of composites; improved hydraulic and electrical systems; minefield, navigation and automatic flight control system with automatic towing and approach and departure from hover modes.
  • S-80E - Export version of CH-53E. None sold to date.
  • S-80M - Export version of MH-53E; total of 11 delivered to Japan for Japanese Maritime Self-Defence Force (JMSDF).
  • CH-53K / CH-53X - Project for enhanced version. Feilding date 2018.

Sikorsky S-66 - Projected high-speed compound attack helicopter as an entry to the AAFSS competition in 1964. Lost to Lockheed AH-56 Cheyenne.

Sikorsky S-67 "Blackhawk" - Attack helicopter demonstrator with S-61 rotor and components, and two 1119kW General Electric T58-GE-5 engines. Developed in 1970 when the AAFSS competition was delayed and Lockheed AH-56 failed requirements. Abandoned after famous crash in 1974.

Sikorsky S-68 - US Army-funded Aerial Armoured Reconnaissance Vehicle (AARV).

Sikorsky S-69 / XH-59 - Experimental coaxial rotor compound heli designed to study the Advancing Blade Concept (ABC). Powered by single 1825shp PT6T-3 Turbo Twin Pac engine, with two 1350kg J60-P-3A turbojet engines for compound flight. First prototype 73-21941 crashed and was later used as a NASA wind-tunnel test article.

  • XH-59A / YH-59A - Designation for initial S-69 aircraft.
  • XH-59B - Unused proposal for configuration with advanced rotors, new powerplant (two GE T700s), and a ducted pusher propeller at the tail.

Sikorsky S-70 "Black Hawk" - Medium transport/utility heli developed in response to the Army's 1972 UTTAS program to replace the UH-1 series. Competed with the Boeing-Vertol YUH-61A, which lost in 1976.

  • YUH-60A - The initial test and evaluation version. First flight on 17 October 1974; three built.
  • UH-60A Black Hawk - Original U.S. Army version, carrying a crew of four and up to 11 equipped troops. Equipped with T700-GE-700 engines. Produced 1977–1989.
  • UH-60C Black Hawk - Modified version for Command and control (C2) missions.
  • CH-60E - Proposed troop transport variant for the US Marine Corps.
  • UH-60L Black Hawk - UH-60A with upgraded T700-GE-701C engines, improved durability gearbox, and updated flight control system. Produced 1989–2007. UH-60Ls are also being equipped with the GE T700-GE-701D engine.
  • UH-60M Black Hawk - Improved design wide chord rotor blades, T700-GE-701D engines (max 2,000 shp/1,500 kW each), improved durability gearbox, Integrated Vehicle Management Systems (IVHMS) computer, and new glass ****pit. Production began in 2006. Planned to replace older U.S. Army UH-60s.
  • UH-60M Upgrade Black Hawk - UH-60M with fly-by-wire system and Common Avionics Architecture System (CAAS) ****pit suite. Flight testing began in August 2008
  • EH-60A Quick Fix(?) - UH-60A with modified electrical system and stations for two electronic systems mission operators. All examples of type have been converted back to standard UH-60A configuration.
  • YEH-60B Quick Fix II - UH-60A modified for special radar and avionics installations, prototype for stand-off target acquisition system.
  • EH-60C Black Hawk - UH-60A modified with special electronics equipment and external antenna. (All examples of type have been taken back to standard UH-60A configuration.)
  • EUH-60L (no official name assigned) - UH-60L modified with additional mission electronic equipment for Army Airborne C2.
  • EH-60L Black Hawk - EH-60A with major mission equipment upgrade.
  • UH-60Q Black Hawk - UH-60A modified for medical evacuation.The UH-60Q is named DUSTOFF for "dedicated unhesitating service to our fighting forces".
  • HH-60L (no official name assigned) - UH-60L extensively modified with medical mission equipment. Components include an external rescue hoist, integrated patient configuration system, environmental control system, on-board oxygen system (OBOGS), and crashworthy ambulatory seats.
  • HH-60M Black Hawk - US Army variant. UH-60M with medical mission equipment (medevac version). Also has no gunner's windows, and includes a nose mounted FLIR.
  • MH-60A Black Hawk - US Army variant. 30 UH-60As modified with additional avionics, night vision capable ****pit, FLIR, M134 door guns, internal axillary fuel tanks and other Special Operations mission equipment in early 1980s. Equipped with T700-GE-701 engines. Variant was used by the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment. The MH-60As were replaced by MH-60Ls beginning in the early 1990s and passed to the Air National Guard.
  • MH-60K Black Hawk - US Army variant. Special operations modification first ordered in 1988 for use by the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment ("Night Stalkers"). Equipped with the in-flight refueling probe, and T700-GE-701C engines. More advanced than MH-60L, the K-model also includes an integrated avionics system (glass ****pit), AN/APQ-174B terrain-following radar, color weather map generator, improved weapons capability, and various defensive systems.
  • MH-60L Black Hawk - US Army variant. Special operations modification, used by the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment ("Night Stalkers"), based on the UH-60L with T700-701C engines. It was developed as an interim version in the late 1980s pending fielding of the MH-60K. Equipped with many of the systems used on MH-60K, including FLIR, terrain-following radar, color weather map generator, auxiliary fuel system, and laser rangefinder/designator. 37 MH-60Ls were built and some 10 had received a in-flight refueling probe by 2003.
  • MH-60L Direct Action Penetrator (DAP) - US Army variant. Special operations modification of the baseline MH-60L, operated by the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment. The DAP is equipped with ESSS or ETS stub wings, each capable of carrying a M230 Chain Gun 30 mm automatic cannon, rocket pods, and various other armaments. M134D miniguns are used as door guns.
  • MH-60M Black Hawk - US Army variant. Special operations version of UH-60M. It will feature the Rockwell Collins Common Avionics Architecture System (CAAS) glass ****pit and more powerful YT706-GE-700 engines
  • MH-60 Black Hawk stealth helicopter - One of two specially modified MH-60s used in the raid on Osama bin Laden's hideout in Pakistan on 1 May 2011 was damaged in a hard landing, and was subsequently destroyed by US forces. Subsequent reports state that the Black Hawk destroyed was a previously unconfirmed, but rumored, modification of the design with reduced noise signature and stealth technology. The modifications are said to add several hundred pounds to the base helicopter including edge alignment panels, special coatings and anti-radar treatments for the windshields.
  • UH-60A RASCAL - NASA-modified version for the Rotorcraft-Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory: $US25M program for the study of helicopter maneuverability in three programs, Superaugmented Controls for Agile Maneuvering Performance (SCAMP), Automated Nap-of-the-Earth (ANOE) and Rotorcraft Agility and Pilotage Improvement Demonstration (RAPID).
  • VH-60D Night Hawk - USMC variant. VIP-configured HH-60D, used for Presidential transport. T700-GE-401C engines.Variant was later redesignated VH-60N.
  • VH-60N White Hawk- USMC variant. Modified UH-60A with some features from the SH-60B/F Seahawks. Used for Presidential and VIP transport. It entered service in 1988 and nine were delivered.
  • UH-60J Black Hawk - Variant for the Japanese Air Self Defense Force and Maritime Self Defense Force produced under license by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. Also known as the S-70-12.
  • UH-60JA Black Hawk - Variant for the Japanese Ground Self Defense Force. It is license produced by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries.
  • AH-60L Arpía III - Export version for Colombia. It is Counter-insurgency (COIN) attack version with improved electronics, firing system, FLIR, radar, light rockets and machine gun. It was developed by Elbit, Sikorsky, and the Colombian Air Force.
  • AH-60L Battle Hawk - Export version unsuccessfully tendered for Australian Army project AIR87, similar to AH-60L Arpía III.
  • UH-60P Black Hawk - Version for the Republic of Korea, based on UH-60L with some improvements. Around 150 were produced domestically by Korean Air.
  • S-70A-1 Desert Hawk - Export version for the Royal Saudi Land Forces.
  • S-70A-L1 Desert Hawk - Aeromedical evacuation version for the Royal Saudi Land Forces.
  • S-70-5 Black Hawk - Export version for the Philippine Air Force.
  • S-70-6 Black Hawk - Export version for Thailand.
  • S-70A-9 Black Hawk - Export version for Australia, assembled under licence by Hawker de Havilland. First eight delivered to the Royal Australian Air Force, subsequently transferred to the Australian Army; remainder delivered straight to the Army after rotary-wing assets divested by the Air Force in 1989.
  • S-70-11 Black Hawk - Export version for the Royal Jordanian Air Force.
  • S-70-12 Black Hawk - Search and rescue model for the Japanese Air Self Defense Force and Maritime Self Defense Force. Also known as the UH-60J.
  • S-70-14 Black Hawk - Export version for Brunei.
  • S-70-16 Black Hawk - Engine test bed for the Rolls-Royce/Turbomeca RTM 332.
  • S-70-17 Black Hawk - Export version for Turkey.
  • S-70-18 Black Hawk - UH-60P and HH-60P for Republic of Korea built under license.
  • Sikorsky/Westland S-70-19 Black Hawk - This version is built under license in the United Kingdom by Westland. Also known as the WS-70.
  • S-70-20 Black Hawk - VIP transport version for Thailand.
  • S-70-21 Black Hawk - Export version for Egypt.
  • S-70-22 Black Hawk - VH-60P for Republic of Korea built under license. Used for VIP transport by the Republic of Korea Air Force. Its fuselage is tipped with white to distinguish from normal HH-60P.
  • S-70-24 Black Hawk - Export version for Mexico.
  • S-70-26 Black Hawk - Export version for Morocco.
  • S-70-27 Black Hawk - Search and rescue version for the Hong Kong Government Flying Service; three built.
  • S-70A-30 Black Hawk - Export version for Argentine Air Force, used as a VIP transport helicopter by the Presidential fleet; one built.
  • S-70A-39 Black Hawk - VIP transport version for Chile; one built.
  • S-70A-42 Black Hawk - Export version for Austria.
  • S-70A-43 Black Hawk - Export version for Royal Thai Army.
  • S-70A-50 Black Hawk - Export version for Israel; 15 built.
  • S-70i Black Hawk - International military version assembled by Sikorsky's subsidiary, PZL Mielec in Poland.
  • T-70 - A Turkish variant of the S-70i, built under license by Turkish Aerospace Industries with indigenous Turkish mission-computer, avionics, landing gear and transmission.
  • HH-60A - Prototype for the HH-60D rescue helicopter. A modified UH-60A primarily designed for combat search and rescue. It is equipped with a rescue hoist with a 200 ft (60.96 m) cable that has a 600 lb (270 kg) lift capability, and a retractable in-flight refueling probe.
  • HH-60D Night Hawk - Prototype of combat rescue variant for the US Air Force.
  • HH-60E - Proposed search and rescue variant for the US Air Force.
  • HH-60G Pave Hawk - Search and rescue helicopter for the US Air Force. UH-60A Credible Hawk were updated to the HH-60G configuration as part of the first phase in a two-phase program.
  • MH-60G Pave Hawk - Special Operations, search and rescue model for the US Air Force. Equipped with long-range fuel tanks, air-to-air refueling capability, FLIR, improved radar. Powered by T-700-GE-700/701 engines.
  • HH-60H Rescue Hawk - Special Operations, search and rescue model for the US Navy. Equipped with long-range fuel tanks, FLIR, improved radar, and 2 BRU auxiliary fuel/armament racks allowing the addition of external fuel tanks and the Hellfire guided weapons system.
  • Maplehawk - Proposed search and rescue version for the Canadian Forces to replace aging CH-113 Labradors. The CF opted for the CH-149 Cormorant instead.
  • HH-60M - a search and rescue version of UH-60M with a glass ****pit and more powerful engines.
  • HH-60P Pave Hawk - Combat Search and Rescue variant of UH-60P, in service with Republic of Korea Air Force. Confirmed equipment of External Tank System and FLIR for night operations.
  • YSH-60B Seahawk - Developmental version of Sea Hawk, led to SH-60B; five built.
  • SH-60B Seahawk - Anti-submarine warfare helicopter, equipped with an APS-124 search radar and an ALQ-142 ESM system under the nose, also fitted with a 25-tube sonobuoy launcher on the left side and modified landing gear; 181 built for the US Navy.
  • NSH-60B Seahawk - Permanently configured for flight testing.
  • CH-60E - Proposed troop transport version for the US Marine Corps. Not built.
  • SH-60F "Oceanhawk" - Carrier-borne anti-submarine warfare helicopter, equipped with dipping sonar; 81 built for the US Navy.
  • NSH-60F Seahawk - Modified SH-60F to support the VH-60N ****pit Upgrade Program.
  • HH-60H "Rescue Hawk" - Search and rescue helicopter for the US Navy; 42 built.
  • XSH-60J - Two US built pattern aircraft for Japan.
  • SH-60J - Anti-submarine warfare helicopter for the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force.
  • YSH-60R Seahawk - ?
  • MH-60R Seahawk -?
  • YCH-60S "Knighthawk" - ?
  • MH-60S "Knighthawk" - ?
  • S-70B Seahawk - Sikorsky's designation for Seahawk. Designation is often used for exports.
  • S-70B-1 Seahawk - Anti-submarine version for the Spanish Navy. The Seahawk is configured with the LAMPS (Light Airbone Multipurpose System)
  • S-70B-2 Seahawk - Anti-submarine version for the Royal Australian Navy, similar to the SH-60B Seahawk in US Navy operation.
  • S-70B-3 Seahawk - Anti-submarine version for the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force. Also known as the SH-60J. The JMSDF ordered 101 units, with deliveries starting in 1991.
  • S-70-4 Seahawk - Sikorsky's designation for the SH-60F Oceanhawk.
  • S-70-5 - Sikorsky's designation for the HH-60H Rescue Hawk and HH-60J Jayhawk.
  • S-70B-6 Aegean Hawk - the Greek military variant which is a blend of the SH-60B and F models, based on Taiwan's S-70C(M)1/2.
  • S-70B-7 Seahawk - Export version for the Royal Thai Navy.
  • S-70B-28 Seahawk - Export version for Turkey.
  • S-70C - Designation for civil variants of the H-60.
  • S-70C(M)-1/2 Thunderhawk - Export version for the Republic of China (Taiwan) Navy, equipped with an undernose radar and a dipping sonar.
  • S-70C-2 - 24 radar-equipped UH-60 Black Hawks for China, the delivery of the helicopters was halted by an embargo.
  • S-70C-6 Super Blue Hawk - Search and rescue helicopter for Taiwan, equipped with undernose radar, plus provision for four external fuel tanks on two sub wings.
  • S-70C-14 - VIP transport version for Brunei; two built.
  • S-70A (N) Naval Hawk - Maritime variant that blends the S-70A Black Hawk and S-70B Seahawk designs.
  • S-70L - Sikorsky's original designation for the SH-60B Seahawk.
  • HH-60J Jayhawk - Medium range recovery helicopter. 42 units delivered to the USCG between 1990 and 1996
  • MH-60T - Medium range recovery helicopter. 42 existing HH-60J airframes receiving upgraded avionics and operational capabilities, including armaments, beginning in 2007 and continuing through 2015.
  • S-78 - Alternate designation of S-70C-20.
  • S-78-29 - Civil S-70 version with 29 seats and retractable undercarriage.

Sikorsky SH-60B "Sea Hawk" / SH-60F "Ocean Hawk" - See S-70 list.

Sikorsky EH-60A "Quick Fix II" - See S-70 list.

Sikorsky S-71 - Proposed attack helicopter using dynamic components from the S-70. Was an entry to the AAH program, in which it lost to the Hughes 77 (YAH-64) and the Bell 409 (YAH-63).

Sikorsky S-72 RSRA / X-Wing / S-72X1 - Experimental hybrid helicopter/fixed-wing aircraft with two General Electric TF-34 turbofans in two outboard nacelles, which complimented the two 1044kW General Electric T58-GE-5 turboshaft engines. Funding was pulled in the late 1980s and flying demonstrator placed in storage at Edwards AFB.

Sikorsky S-73 - Sikorsky's entry for the HLH program, lost to the Boeing XCH-62.

Sikorsky S-74 - Original designation for S-76. The number "76" was chosen instead to coincide with the 1976 bicentennial, as it made it a better sounding commercial designation.

Sikorsky S-75 ACAP - Proof-of-concept all-composite heli developed as part of the Army's Advanced Composite Airframe Programme (ACAP). Performance compared with Bell D-292 ACAP. Apparently it was found to have exceeded the weight- and cost-saving criteria set by the Army in the original ACAP specification.

Sikorsky S-76 "Spirit" - Medium-size commercial utility heli using similar blades to the S-70.

  • S-74 - Original designation.
  • S-76 - Designation applicable to aircraft delivered before 1 March 1982.
  • S-76A - Original production version, powered by two 485 kW (650 shp) Rolls-Royce (Allison) 250-C30 turboshaft engines. Large number modified to S-76A+, A++, C, and C+. 284 manufactured.
  • S-76A Utility - Utility transport version, equipped with sliding doors and a strengthened floor.
  • S-76A+  Unsold S-76s were fitted with two Turbomeca Arriel 1S turboshaft engines. 17 manufactured.
  • S-76A++ - S-76 helicopters fitted with two Turbomeca Arriel 1S1 turboshaft engines.
  • S-76A Mk II - Improved all-weather transport version, fitted with more powerful engines, and other detail improvements.
  • S-76B - Powered by two Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6B-36A or Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6B-36B turboshaft engines. 101 built.
  • S-76B-7 - Version for Thailand (12 ex.)
  • S-76C  - Powered by two 539-kW (981-shp) Turboméca Arriel 1S1 turboshaft engines. 43 manufactured.
  • S-76C+ - Uprated version, fitted with improved Turboméca Arriel 2S1 turboshafts with FADEC. 35 manufactured.
  • S-76C++ - Turboméca Arriel 2S2
  • S-76D - Powered by two Pratt & Whitney Canada PW210S.
  • S-76EMS - ?
  • H-76 Eagle - Armed military proposal, demonstrator shown at Farnborough International, 1984.
  • AUH-76 Eagle - Armed utility transport version, developed from the S-76 Mk. II.
  • H-76B Eagle - Military version of the S-76B. Fantail version??
  • H-76N Eagle - Planned naval version of 1984, not implemented.
  • H-76N Super Searcher - Proposed version with MEL Super Searcher radar.
  • H-76N Seaspray - Proposed version with Ferranti Seaspray III.
  • Sikorsky S-76-5 SHADOW - Boeing-Sikorsky MANPRINT study. The original concept of the LHX program was to produce a one-man helicopter that could do more than a two-man aircraft. The Sikorsky (S-76) Helicopter Advance Demonstrator of Operators Workload (SHADOW) had a single-pilot advanced ****pit grafted to its nose. The MANPRINT study determined that single-pilot operation of the Comanche was unsafe, and would result in pilot overload. As result of this study, the Comanche was designed to be operated by a crew of two.

    ------ Also submitted to the Army's ARTI (Advanced Rotorcraft Technology Integration) program????

Sikorsky S-77 - ?

Sikorsky S-78 (+) - See S-70 list.

Sikorsky S-79 - ?

Sikorsky S-80 / CH-53E / MH-53E - See CH-53 family list.

????  - ???? (just assuming there's more designations)

Sikorsky S-90 - ?

Sikorsky S-92 - Four-blade twin-engine medium-lift heli developed from the S-70.

  • S-92A Helibus - Civilian variant.
  • S-92B - ?
  • S-92C Helibus - ?
  • S-92IU (S-92M) Helibus (Growth Hawk)
  • H-92 Superhawk - Military variant. Name announced at the Paris Air Show 16 June 2003. Features uprated 2,289kW CT7-8C engines providing some 25% more power than the S-92's CT7-8A; folding main and tail rotors; BAE Systems fly-by-wire controls; self-sealing fuel tanks; armour protection for critical components; self-defence systems including chaff/flare dispensers and IR suppression; and Rockwell Collins mission avionics. Programme timetable dependent on engine development, with first flight tests of CT7-8C targeted for 2006 and certification on H-92 in 2007.
  • VH-92 - Unlucky contender for VH-71 program.

Sikorsky "Cypher" - UAV consisting of two four-blade contra-rotating rotors, driven by a 52hp UEL AR 801 rotary engine, inside a 1.95m diameter graphite/epoxy shroud.

Sikorsky MARINER / "Cypher II" / "Dragon Warrior" - (MARIne-Navy Extended-range Reconnaissance) UAV developed in conjunction with General Dynamics Information Systems, selected by the US Marines for testing UAV operating concepts and payloads.

Sikorsky Universal Tactical Vehicle (UTV) - Unknown flying-crane project.

Sikorsky SH-X - Unknown navy project.

Sikorsky X2 - Experimental coaxial-rotor compound heli with pusher tail rotor. There are six proposed variants:

  • Intermediate Commercial
  • SAR
  • Flying-crane
  • Cargo/Heavy-lift
  • Light Military / Light Tactical Helicopter - Developed into S-97 "Raider" project.
  • Attack helicopter

Sikorsky S-97 "Raider" - Proposed high-speed scout and attack helicopter based on the X2 technology demonstrator. First prototype planned to fly in late 2013 or early 2014 near the release of the Armed Aerial Scout Request for Proposals.

Sikorsky / Raytheon UCAR - (Unmanned Combat Armed Rotorcraft), an all-weather, highly autonomous and survivable unmanned rotorcraft fully integrated into the Army's objective force combat maneuver force structure.

Sikorsky DS-103 - Missile-carrier flying-crane study.

Sikorsky DS-160 - Flying-crane study.

Sikorsky DS-233 - ?

Sikorsky S-434 - A project originally by Schweizer, now Sikorsky since the purchase of the company.

Sikorsky S-2000 - Possible designation for S-76 fantail demonstrator?

LHX - (Light Helicopter Experimental), Boeing and Sikorsky (as "First Team"). Program was a 1980s Army project to replace the AH-1 Cobra and OH-58 helicopters with an all-composite and and advanced military helicopter.

  • Boeing-Sikorsky RAH-66 "Comanche" / YRAH-66 - Selected winner of the program developed by First Team. Two prototypes built. Program cancelled in 2004.

 



-- Edited by Leela25 on Sunday 5th of February 2012 12:40:39 AM



-- Edited by Leela25 on Wednesday 15th of February 2012 03:54:44 AM

__________________
Airwolf_logo.jpg


Former Deputy Administrator

Posts: 897
Date: Feb 4, 2012
Permalink  
 

Need help? I've got a pretty complete list from S-1 to S-76.

__________________

Stéphane



Global Moderator

Posts: 1327
Date: Feb 4, 2012
Permalink  
 

I think I do. There's some in the list I don't know about and I think there are some missing ones. :P



__________________
Airwolf_logo.jpg


Administrator

Posts: 3381
Date: Feb 4, 2012
Permalink  
 

Wow, what an amazing list!!!!!! 

I didn't even know there were so many S-70 developments out there!!!!



__________________
Brony rotorhead
--------------------------
               ζ  
--------------------------


Veteran Member - Level 2

Posts: 226
Date: Feb 4, 2012
Permalink  
 

Leela25 wrote:

I am going to list EVERY known Sikorsky designation, in the HannetonIII style designation list. 


 

*looks over list*

1701517.jpg



-- Edited by hannetonIII on Sunday 5th of February 2012 01:00:08 AM

__________________


Global Moderator

Posts: 1327
Date: Feb 4, 2012
Permalink  
 

LMAO!! XD

Glad you like it! :D



__________________
Airwolf_logo.jpg


Veteran Member - Level 2

Posts: 226
Date: Feb 4, 2012
Permalink  
 

Seriously you've done an incredible job utilizing my style. And BTW, how did you do the sublist-within-a-sublist, i.e. the Westland "Dragonfly" variants?



Attachments
__________________


Administrator

Posts: 3381
Date: Feb 4, 2012
Permalink  
 

Leela25 wrote:
  • XH-59B - Unused proposal for configuration with advanced rotors, new powerplant (two GE T700s), and a ducted pusher propeller at the tail.

 

I'm going to be loose with the rules and share it here before I forget:

(from "Warplanes of the future", Bill Gunston)



Attachments
__________________
Brony rotorhead
--------------------------
               ζ  
--------------------------


Administrator

Posts: 3381
Date: Feb 6, 2012
Permalink  
 

hannetonIII wrote:

BTW, how did you do the sublist-within-a-sublist, i.e. the Westland "Dragonfly" variants?


 

I can tell you that's a simple html trick, like so:

<ul>

<li>text

<ul>

    <li>text</li>

    <li>text</li>

    </ul>

 

--------------------------------------------

  • text
    • text
    • text


__________________
Brony rotorhead
--------------------------
               ζ  
--------------------------


Administrator

Posts: 3381
Date: Feb 6, 2012
Permalink  
 

Okay Leela, I looked over the list again and you're missing these:

S-63: Initial designation of the S-62B

S-68: US Army-funded Aerial Armoured Reconnaissance Vehicle (AARV)

S-78: Alternate designation of S-70C-20

S-90: ?

S-434:  A project originally by Schweizer, now Sikorsky since the purchase of the company.

S-2000: (Need clarification... S-76 fantail demonstrator?)

DS-103: Missile-carrier flying crane study

DS-160: Flying-crane study

DS-233: ?

 

Probably should include the RAH-66 Comanche and Piasecki X-49A in the list as well. The Piasecki one I suggest being in the S-70 sublists.



__________________
Brony rotorhead
--------------------------
               ζ  
--------------------------


Former Deputy Administrator

Posts: 897
Date: Feb 6, 2012
Permalink  
 

Leela, you are impressive! this is one heckuva research work, and I should know, since I've been doing the same kind of lists ever since I was a child!!

A few remarks:


  • S-46 = VS-300
  • S-47 = VS-300A
  • S-48 = VS-316A (R-4) and VS-316-A2 (HNS-1)
  • S-49 = VS-316B (R-6)
  • S-50 = VS-327 (R-5 up to the "E" version" and HO2S) (the wooden mockup known also as the S-50 may or may not be connected to the program)
  • S-51 = H-5F to H-5H and HO3S
  • S-63 was the first designation of the S-62B, as was said above.
  • S-68 was the US Army's AARV program, several pics of the mockup exist.
  • S-74 was the original designation for the S-76. The number "76" was chosen instead to coincide with the 1976 bicentennial, as it made it a better sounding commercial designation.
  • S-78-20 was indeed the inhouse designation for the S-70C-20. However I've also found an S-78-29, which I don't know anything about.


More remarks likely to come when I dig further into your wonderful list!

__________________

Stéphane



Former Deputy Administrator

Posts: 897
Date: Feb 6, 2012
Permalink  
 

Okay, here goes:

S-48

  • VS-316-1 was modification with Warner R-600 engine


S-50

  • XR-5A designation also existed
  • I have the R-5B as the YR-5B
  • I have the YR-5C as the XR-5C
  • I think there was also an R-5E/H-5E, not just the "Y" pre-series
  • thre was also a proposed commercial variant of VS-327


S-51

  • "Horse" name you quoted seems dubious (source?)
  • I have HO3S-2 as the XHO3S-2
  • also WS-51 Widgeon II commercial derivative (different fuselage)


S-52

  • plain S-52 only became S-52-1 when used for altitude/speed records)
  • S-52-2: stretched four-seater commercial version
  • YH-18 and YH-18A were also S-52-2
  • HO5S-1 and HO3S-1G were S-52-3
  • YH-18B were S-52-4 and S-52-5 (difference unknown)


S-54

  • S-54: R-4B bought back by Sikorsky and modified to the "sesqui-tandem" configuration


S-58

  • H-34G.I version for Germany


S-59

  • one S-52-3 modified with 250 hp XT51-T-3 Artouste I turbine (XH-39?)
  • one HO5S-1 modified for U.S. Army with Artouste II turbine (XH-39A?)


S-61

  • S-61NM designation also existed
  • AS-61N-1 designation also existed
  • The USCG's HH-3F "Pelican" was also the S-61R
  • S-61 Commando (no data)
  • also S-61 Advanced Sea King (no data)


S-69

  • YH-59A designation also existed


S-76

  • there was also an S-76 Mark II
  • S-67B-7: version for Thailand (12 ex.)
  • "Shadow" was S-76-5 (also maybe S-76B, needs confirmation)
  • "Shadow" was submitted to the Army's ARTI program (Advanced Rotorcraft Technology Integration)
  • S-76EMS designation also existed
  • H-76 Eagle proposal
  • AH-76 Eagle proposal
  • AUH-76 Eagle proposal
  • H-76B was Eagle 'Fantail' (also known as S-2000)
  • H-76N Eagle
  • H-76N Super Searcher (proposed version with MEL Super Searcher radar)
  • H-76N Seaspray (proposed version with Ferranti Seaspray III)


S-80

  • S-80M same as MH-53E
  • S-80M-1 same as CH-53K Super Stallion
  • S-80M-1 also for Japanese version


S-92

  • S-92 Helibus
  • S-92C Helibus
  • S-92IU (S-92M) Helibus (Growth Hawk)
  • VH-92 (unlucky contender for VH-71 program


Others

  • YRAH-66A Comanche (with Boeing Helicopter) for LHX
  • no hyphen in X2


-- Edited by Stargazer2006 on Monday 6th of February 2012 09:55:05 PM

__________________

Stéphane



Veteran Member - Level 3

Posts: 281
Date: Feb 6, 2012
Permalink  
 

As I know,

 

S-90       (propably a folded tail rotor,a smaller helicopter than

                S-92 ).

 S-97       well known helicopter.

S-78-29  was 29 passenger helicopter, a civil version of S-70 with

               enlarge cabin and retractable undercarriage,it had a new

                shape.



-- Edited by hesham on Monday 6th of February 2012 10:56:20 PM

__________________
hesham


Veteran Member - Level 2

Posts: 186
Date: Feb 6, 2012
Permalink  
 

hesham wrote:

S-78-29  was 29 passenger helicopter, a civil version of S-70 with

               enlarge cabin and retractable undercarriage,it had a new

                shape.


 

Interesting. Does the "-29" part of the designation indicate the seat number? Like the CTR designs by Bell?



__________________

"I love the smell of CGI in the morning..."



Veteran Member - Level 3

Posts: 281
Date: Feb 8, 2012
Permalink  
 

Sidewinder wrote:
hesham wrote:

S-78-29  was 29 passenger helicopter, a civil version of S-70 with

               enlarge cabin and retractable undercarriage,it had a new

                shape.


 

Interesting. Does the "-29" part of the designation indicate the seat number? Like the CTR designs by Bell?


 Yes.



__________________
hesham


Veteran Member - Level 3

Posts: 305
Date: Feb 9, 2012
Permalink  
 

hannetonIII wrote:
Leela25 wrote:

I am going to list EVERY known Sikorsky designation, in the HannetonIII style designation list. 


 

*looks over list*

1701517.jpg



-- Edited by hannetonIII on Sunday 5th of February 2012 01:00:08 AM


 

I hope that pic spawns a forum meme. biggrin

Also EPIC list, Leela25!!!!!!!!



__________________

Vince Johnson - A merciless enemy but a powerful ally.

                           dragonfire1.gif

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Veteran Member - Level 2

Posts: 107
Date: Feb 9, 2012
Permalink  
 

Actually I think EH-60A is the "Quick Fix II", not the YEH-60B. Though the first S-70 platform to carry the name is a mystery to me.



__________________


Former Deputy Administrator

Posts: 897
Date: Feb 12, 2012
Permalink  
 

Leela hasn't shown up in days now. Been eagerly waiting for her reactions to our additions...

__________________

Stéphane



Veteran Member - Level 3

Posts: 281
Date: Feb 12, 2012
Permalink  
 

Hi,

S-74 was original designation of S-76.



__________________
hesham


Administrator

Posts: 3381
Date: Feb 12, 2012
Permalink  
 

hesham wrote:

Hi,

S-74 was original designation of S-76.


 

Thanks Hesham, but it was covered already in Stephane's post:

 

Stargazer2006 wrote:

  • S-74 was the original designation for the S-76. The number "76" was chosen instead to coincide with the 1976 bicentennial, as it made it a better sounding commercial designation.


  •  



    __________________
    Brony rotorhead
    --------------------------
                   ζ  
    --------------------------


    Global Moderator

    Posts: 1327
    Date: Feb 14, 2012
    Permalink  
     

    ZOMG thanks guys, I just added those!! :D



    __________________
    Airwolf_logo.jpg


    Global Moderator

    Posts: 1327
    Date: Feb 14, 2012
    Permalink  
     

    SuperStallion wrote:

    Actually I think EH-60A is the "Quick Fix II", not the YEH-60B. Though the first S-70 platform to carry the name is a mystery to me.


     

    I thought that too but chronologically it doesn't make sense, so I renamed them how I felt was right. :P



    __________________
    Airwolf_logo.jpg


    Veteran Member - Level 1

    Posts: 41
    Date: Feb 14, 2012
    Permalink  
     

    Regarding the CH-53K

    scan.jpg



    __________________

    Burn Rubber does not mean Warp Speed!

    vt2.png

    «First  <  1 2 3  >  Last»  | Page of 3  sorted by
     
    Quick Reply

    Please log in to post quick replies.

    Post to Digg Post to Del.icio.us


    Create your own FREE Forum
    Report Abuse
    Powered by ActiveBoard